High School - Social Studies

World History I (22150G)
In this course, students will explore the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until circa 1500 A.D. The course requires students to describe and compare selected civilizations in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in terms of chronology, location, geography, social structures, forms of government, economy, religion, and contributions to later civilizations. Geographic content and skills will be emphasized in addition to historical content and skills.
Honors World History I (22150H)
This course will require students to explore in depth the civilizations which developed in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas from ancient times until 1500 A.D. Students will apply skills in inquiry/research, technology, geographic knowledge, and historical content in order to compare and contrast selected civilizations. Students will be expected to describe, analyze, and evaluate orally and in written research papers, the patterns and networks of geography, religion, social structures, government, economy, location, and historical cause and effect of people and events on ancient civilizations. Students will compare extensive supplementary readings and analytical papers. The course will help prepare students for the expectations and skill sets required to be successful in an AP course. This course receives honors weighted credit.
World History II (22160G)
This course covers history and geography from the late Middle Ages 1500 A.D. to the present with emphasis on Western Europe. Geographic influences on history continue to be explored, with increasing attention given to political boundaries that developed with the evolution of nation-states. Significant attention is given to the ways in which scientific and technological revolutions created new economic conditions that in turn produced social and political changes. The people and events of the 19th and 20th centuries are emphasized for their strong connections to contemporary issues. The course strikes a balance between the broad themes of history and specific historic events, ideas, issues, persons, and documents. Using texts, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, charts, and a variety of chronological, inquiry/research, and technological skills, students develop competence in chronological thinking, historical comprehension, and historical analysis.
Honors World History II (22160H)
Prerequisite or Grade Level: World History I or Honors World History I

In this course the origin of western civilization and the impact of non-western civilization upon the West and upon world cultures from 1500 A.D. to present are central themes of this course. Through study of cultures, geography, and historical development, the course leads to a deeper understanding of contemporary global issues. Distinguishing characteristics found within each of the cultures are examined through literature, art, architecture, music, religion, and philosophy. Historical emphasis is placed upon such areas as comparative political, economic, and social systems. Emphasis is placed upon current crises, international relations, and the increasing interdependence of nations. Concepts and techniques employed by historians, archaeologists, and other social scientists are explored and practiced. The course demands outside readings, analysis of primary source material, and application and evaluation of research. The course will help prepare students for the expectations and skill sets required to be successful in an AP class. This course receives honors weighted credit.
AP European History (23990AP)
This is a yearlong AP course that may be taken in place of World History II. Students will be required to take the World History II EOC SOL test, if the student has not previously passed the assessment. Students will develop an understanding of the main themes in the study of modern European history. The themes cover political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history from 1450 to the present. The students will learn four types of skills: chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, crafting historical arguments from historical evidence, and historical interpretation and synthesis. Special focus will be paid to causes and effects of events from short to long term, the interaction of multiple causes and effects, and “turning point” events that led to major shifts in European history. Geography skills will be developed through the analysis of a country’s location in a geopolitical context. The course will utilize a college -level textbook and prepare students for college readiness and success. This course receives advanced weighted credit, if the student sits for the corresponding College Board exam.
Virginia and U.S. History (23600G)
This course covers the development of American ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present. It focuses on political and economic history, and provides students with a basic knowledge of American culture through a chronological survey of major issues, movements, people, and events in United States and Virginia history.
Honors Virginia and U.S. History (23600H)
This course covers the development of American ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present. It focuses on political and economic history and provides students with a basic knowledge of American culture through a chronological survey of major issues, movements, people, and events in United States and Virginia history. Higher levels of thinking and reasoning
are taught which include analysis and synthesis. Time will be allocated for independent research. The course will help prepare students for the expectations and skill sets required to be successful in an AP class. This course receives honors weighted credit.
AP United States History (23190AP)
Prerequisite: World History I and II; Honors World History II is highly recommended

This is a yearlong course and may replace Virginia and U.S. History. It prepares students for the AP examination in United States History. AP United States History covers the historical development of American ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present. The course focuses on political and economic history and provides students with a basic knowledge of American culture through a chronological survey of major issues, movements, people, and events in United States and Virginia history. The course demands outside reading, analysis of primary source material, and research application and evaluation technologies that enhance student learning. Summer work will be assigned in June and the work will be collected during the first week of school. This course receives advanced weighted credit, if the student sits for the corresponding College Board exam.
Virginia and U.S. Government (24400G)
This course focuses on an understanding of the origins and workings of the American and Virginian political systems. It focuses on the United States and Virginia constitutions, the structure and operation of United States and Virginia governments, and the process of policy-making, with emphasis on economics, foreign affairs, and civil rights issues. Course objectives include the impact of the general public, political parties, interest groups, and the media on policy decisions. United States’ political and economic systems are compared with those of other nations, with emphasis on the relationships between economic and political freedoms.
Honors Virginia and U.S. Government (24400H)
This course focuses on understanding the origins and workings of the American and Virginian political systems. It focuses on the United States and Virginia constitutions, the structure and operation of United States and Virginia governments, and the process of policy-making, with emphasis on economics, foreign affairs, and civil rights issues. Course objectives include the impact of the general public, political parties, interest groups, and the media on policy decisions. United States’ political and economic systems are compared with those of other nations, with emphasis on the relationships between economic and political freedoms. Higher levels of thinking and reasoning are taught which include analysis and synthesis. Time will be allocated for independent research. This course receives honors weighted credit.
AP United States Government and Politics (24450AP)
Prerequisite: Honors Virginia and U. S. History; AP U. S. History is highly recommended

This is a yearlong course and may replace Virginia and U.S. Government. The course prepares students for the AP United States Government and Politics examination. It is designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, including both the study of general concepts used to interpret U. S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U. S. politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Discussion topics that may be explored throughout this course are: constitutional underpinnings of United States Government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government; and public policy. This course receives advanced weighted credit, if the student sits for the corresponding College Board exam.
AP United States Government/Politics and AP Comparative Government (24455AP) - SHS Only
Prerequisite: Honors Virginia and U. S. History; AP U. S. History is highly recommended

This is a yearlong course and covers the material from two AP government courses. The course prepares students for the AP United States Government/Politics and AP Comparative Government examinations. It is designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, including both the study of general concepts used to interpret U. S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U. S. politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Discussion topics that may be explored throughout this course are: constitutional underpinnings of United States Government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of
national government; and public policy. The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes.
Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policy making. For example, we only know that a country has a high population growth rate or serious corruption when we compare it to other countries. Careful comparison of political systems produces useful knowledge about the policies countries have effectively initiated to address problems, or, indeed, what they have done to make things worse. We can compare the effectiveness of policy approaches to poverty or overpopulation by examining how different countries solve similar problems. Furthermore, by comparing the political institutions and practices of wealthy and poor countries, we can begin to understand the political consequences of economic well being. Finally, comparison assists explanation. Why are some countries stable democracies and not others? Why do many democracies have prime ministers instead of presidents? In addition to covering the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the course should cover specific countries and their governments. Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course. China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia are all regularly covered in college-level introductory comparative politics courses. The inclusion of Iran adds a political system from a very important region of the world and one that is subject to distinctive political and cultural dynamics. By using these six core countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete example, noting that not all concepts will be equally useful in all country settings. This course receives advanced weighted credit, if the student sits for both of the corresponding College Board exams.
Psychology (29000G)
This course is designed to introduce students to the systemic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.
AP Psychology (29020AP)
This yearlong course is an introduction to the scientific study of behavioral and mental processes of humans and other animals. The major principles of psychology, including ethics and the methods of psychologists, will be examined. Students will receive an elective credit for this course. This course receives advanced weighted credit, if the student sits for the corresponding College Board exam.
Sociology (25000G)
This course is designed to examine the principles of sociology, the individuals in a group, social institutions, social control, and the use of research methods to examine social problems and issues. The course provides opportunities for students to develop critical thinking, decision-making and social skills concerning human relationships.
DE Macroeconomics (42090DE)
Prerequisite: Student must meet the Virginia Placement Test (VPT) and/or GPA criteria established by PDCCC to enroll in course. 

Fulfills the requirements for ECO201 Principals of Macroeconomics at Paul D. Camp Community College and satisfies one of the requirements for the Uniform Certificate of Graduate Studies and Virginia Passport. Principals of Macroeconomics presents the fundamental macroeconomic concepts, theories, and issues including the study of scarcity and opportunity cost, supply and demand, national economic growth, inflation, recession, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policies, and international trade.  Develops an appreciation of how these economic concepts apply to consumer, business, and government decisions, and their effect on the overall economy. This course receives advanced weight. Please read all the details about dual enrollment under the Programs link on the Program of Studies home page.
DE Microeconomics (42080DE)
Prerequisite: Grade C or higher in DE Macroeconomics; Student must meet the Virginia Placement Test (VPT) and/or GPA criteria established by PDCCC to enroll in course. 

Fulfills the requirements for ECO202 Principals of Microeconomics at Paul D. Camp Community College and satisfies one of the requirements for the Uniform Certificate of Graduate Studies and Virginia Passport. Principals of Microeconomics Presents the fundamental microeconomic concepts, theories, and issues including the study of scarcity and opportunity cost, supply and demand, elasticities, marginal revenues and costs, profits, production and distribution. Develops an appreciation of how these economic concepts apply to consumer and business decisions, and their effect on the individual. This course receives advanced weight. Please read all the details about dual enrollment under the Programs link on the Program of Studies home page.
DE Western Civilization (23770DE)
Prerequisite: Student must meet the Virginia Placement Test (VPT) and/or GPA criteria established by PDCCC to enroll in course. 

Fulfills the requirements for HIS101 Western Civilizations to 1600 CE as well as HIS102 Western Civilizations 1600 CE to present at Paul D. Camp Community College and satisfies one of the requirements for the Uniform Certificate of Graduate Studies and Virginia Passport.  This course examines the development of western civilization from ancient times to present day.  Students must successfully pass HIS 101 in order to continue enrollment in HIS 102.   This course receives advanced weight. Please read all the details about dual enrollment under the Programs link on the Program of Studies home page.